Publications

2018
Harris, Marilyn, and Chana Shoenberger. “Multiple Publications, Stanford Social Innovation Review.” In Social Innovation + Change: Rethinking Cross-Sector Social Innovation Conference. Cambridge, MA: Stanford Social Innovation Review, 2018.Abstract

Schoenberger, Chana: Bidding for Development Aid
Harris, Marilyn: Bottom-Up Corporate Social Responsibility
Harris, Marilyn: Collaborating is Hard Work
Schoenberger, Chana: Harmonizing Tension of Hybrid Organizations

sici_in_stanford_social_innovation_review.pdf
Johnson, Paula. Global Philanthropy Report: Perspectives on the Global Foundation Sector. Cambridge: Harvard Kennedy School, 2018.Abstract

Global philanthropy holds immense promise in the 21stcentury. Global giving is growing, gaining visibility, and creating much-needed change around the world . Over time and across geographies the world has witnessed a near-universal charitable instinct to help others. Recent years, however, have seen a marked and promising change in charitable giving - wealthy individuals, families, and corporations are looking to give more, to give more strategically, and to increase the impact of their social investments.

There appears to be a growing belief that institutional philanthropy can encourage more strategic investment approaches; facilitate collaboration; serve as a role model for others; and, in sum, have greater impact on the economic and social challenges being addressed. Despite the growing significance and scale of institutionally-based philanthropy, remarkably little is known about the related resources and their deployment at the national, regional, and global levels. Until the launch of this effort there has been no ongoing and globally coordinated undertaking to quantify the volume of global giving, classify its purposes, or seek to understand its current and potential impact.

In The Global Philanthropy Report: Perspectives on the Global Foundation Sector, lead author Paula Johnson (Harvard Kennedy School), in collaboration with 20 research partners around the world, seeks to develop a knowledge base to address the size, scope, and practice of institutional philanthropy across the globe.

global_philanthropy_report_final_april_2018.pdf
2017
Rwandan Women Rising
Hunt, Swanee. Rwandan Women Rising. Duke University Press, 2017. Publisher's VersionAbstract

In the spring of 1994, the tiny African nation of Rwanda was ripped apart by a genocide that left nearly a million dead. Neighbors attacked neighbors. Family members turned against their own. After the violence subsided, Rwanda's women—drawn by the necessity of protecting their families—carved out unlikely new roles for themselves as visionary pioneers creating stability and reconciliation in genocide's wake. Today, 64 percent of the seats in Rwanda's elected house of Parliament are held by women, a number unrivaled by any other nation. 
 

While news of the Rwandan genocide reached all corners of the globe, the nation's recovery and the key role of women are less well known. In Rwandan Women Rising, Swanee Hunt shares the stories of some seventy women—heralded activists and unsung heroes alike—who overcame unfathomable brutality, unrecoverable loss, and unending challenges to rebuild Rwandan society. Hunt, who has worked with women leaders in sixty countries for over two decades, points out that Rwandan women did not seek the limelight or set out to build a movement; rather, they organized around common problems such as health care, housing, and poverty to serve the greater good. Their victories were usually in groups and wide ranging, addressing issues such as rape, equality in marriage, female entrepreneurship, reproductive rights, education for girls, and mental health. 
 

These women's accomplishments provide important lessons for policy makers and activists who are working toward equality elsewhere in Africa and other postconflict societies. Their stories, told in their own words via interviews woven throughout the book, demonstrate that the best way to reduce suffering and to prevent and end conflicts is to elevate the status of women throughout the world.

 

About The Author(s)

Swanee Hunt chairs the Washington-based Institute for Inclusive Security. During her tenure as U.S. ambassador to Austria (1993–97), she hosted negotiations and symposia focused on securing peace in the neighboring Balkan states. She is the Eleanor Roosevelt Lecturer in Public Policy at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, CEO of Hunt Alternatives, and a member of the U.S. Council on Foreign Relations. She has appeared on CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, and NPR and written for Foreign AffairsForeign Policy, the International Herald TribuneChicago TribuneLos Angeles Times, and Boston Globe, among other publications. She is the author of Worlds Apart: Bosnian Lessons for Global SecurityHalf-Life of a Zealot, and This Was Not Our War: Bosnian Women Reclaiming the Peace, all also published by Duke University Press.

 

Jimmy Carter was the thirty-ninth president of the United States. A Nobel Prize laureate and author of numerous books, President Carter is the founder of The Carter Center, which has worked for decades to resolve conflict, promote democracy, protect human rights, and prevent disease around the globe.

Huang, Karen, M. Yeomans, A.W. Brooks, J. Minson, and F. Gino. “It Doesn't Hurt to Ask: Question-Asking Increases Liking.” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology (2017). Publisher's VersionAbstract
Conversation is a fundamental human experience that is necessary to pursue intrapersonal and interpersonal goals across myriad contexts, relationships, and modes of communication. In the current research, we isolate the role of an understudied conversational behavior: question-asking. Across 3 studies of live dyadic conversations, we identify a robust and consistent relationship between question-asking and liking: people who ask more questions, particularly follow-up questions, are better liked by their conversation partners. When people are instructed to ask more questions, they are perceived as higher in responsiveness, an interpersonal construct that captures listening, understanding, validation, and care. We measure responsiveness with an attitudinal measure from previous research as well as a novel behavioral measure: the number of follow-up questions one asks. In both cases, responsiveness explains the effect of question-asking on liking. In addition to analyzing live get-to-know-you conversations online, we also studied face-to-face speed-dating conversations. We trained a natural language processing algorithm as a “follow-up question detector” that we applied to our speed-dating data (and can be applied to any text data to more deeply understand question-asking dynamics). The follow-up question rate established by the algorithm showed that speed daters who ask more follow-up questions during their dates are more likely to elicit agreement for second dates from their partners, a behavioral indicator of liking. We also find that, despite the persistent and beneficial effects of asking questions, people do not anticipate that question-asking increases interpersonal liking.
Minson, Julia, J.S. Mueller, and R. P. Larrick. “The Contingent Wisdom of Dyads: When Discussion Undermines Versus Enhances the Accuracy of Collaborative Judgments.” Management Science (2017).Abstract
We evaluate the effect of discussion on the accuracy of collaborative judgments. In contrast to prior research, we show that discussion can either aid or impede accuracy relative to simple averaging of collaborators’ independent judgments, as a systematic function of task type and interaction process. On estimation tasks with a wide range of potential estimates, discussion aided accuracy by helping participants prevent and eliminate egregious errors. On estimation tasks with a naturally bounded range, discussion following independent estimates performed on par with averaging. Importantly, if participants did not first make independent estimates, discussion significantly harmed accuracy by limiting the range of considered estimates, independent of task type. Our research shows that discussion can be a powerful tool for error reduction, but only when structured appropriately: Decision-makers should form independent judgments in order to consider a wide range of possible answers, and then use discussion to eliminate extremely large errors.
Negotiating Conflict in the Middle East and North Africa: A System Analysis after the Arab Spring, the Iran Nuclear Deal, and the Rise of ISIS
Babbitt, Eileen, Arvid Bell, Alain Lempereur, Brian Mandell, and Dana Wolf. Negotiating Conflict in the Middle East and North Africa: A System Analysis after the Arab Spring, the Iran Nuclear Deal, and the Rise of ISIS. The MENA Negotiation Report. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Kennedy School Negotiation Project, 2017. Publisher's VersionAbstract

With the Arab Spring, the Iran nuclear deal, and the rise of ISIS, the reality in the Middle East and North Africa has changed fundamentally over the past few years. This report aims to make contributions to the understanding of the interconnected conflicts in the MENA region. It assesses the shifted network of relationships and alliances in the Middle East and North Africa and helps evaluate the effectiveness of future negotiation strategies to be employed by key actors with influence in the region.

Full report: www.middle-east-negotiation-report.com

2015
Johnson, Paula, and Colleen Kelly. Haiti Funders Forum Feasibility Study. Cambridge: Hauser Institute, Harvard Kennedy School, 2015. Publisher's VersionAbstract

The Hauser Institute conducted a new study exploring the value, parameters, and sustainability of a Haiti Funders Forum. In collaboration with The Haiti Fund at the Boston Foundation and with support from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, researchers Paula Johnson and Colleen Kelly conducted a series of conversations with funder network leaders, individual interviews with Haiti funders, and a survey of a broad range of funders and other constituents to analyze and assess the potential activities and operational issues of a forum. The creation of a Haiti Funders Forum would aim to increase the effectiveness of philanthropy in Haiti by promoting information sharing, networking, and collaboration among grantmakers and social investors and through advocacy for increased philanthropy to and within the country.
 
The report summarizes the findings and makes recommendations on a Forum’s values, mission, and goals; functions and activities; and institutional and operational aspects.

haiti_funders_forum_feasibility_study.pdf
Johnson, Paula, Christine Letts, and Colleen Kelly. From Prosperity to Purpose: Perspectives on Philanthropy and Social Investment among Wealthy Individuals in Latin America. Zurich and Cambridge: UBS Philanthropy Advisory and Hauser Institute, 2015. Publisher's VersionAbstract

From Prosperity to Purpose: Perspectives on Philanthropy and Social Investment among Wealthy Individuals in Latin America explores private giving and social investment among high net worth individuals and families in six Latin American countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Peru), analyzing donors' motivations and aspirations; philanthropic practices and operations; challenges and obstacles to giving; and the types of support, resources, and policy reforms that might increase giving and strengthen its impact.

Completed by researchers at the Hauser Institute at Harvard University and supported by UBS, From Prosperity to Purpose is an effort to advance the understanding, practice, and impact of philanthropy in Latin America.

Laidler-Kylander, Nathalie, Steven Strauss, and Laura Winig. On Your Bike! Using Marketing Mix to Drive Successful Bicycle Sharing Programs in Europe. Cambridge: Harvard Kennedy School, 2015. Publisher's VersionAbstract

European municipalities, eager to increase the use of environmentally friendly forms of public transportation, offered bicycle sharing programs as adjuncts to their public transportation systems. This case focuses on the bicycle sharing systems in three mid-sized European cities: Mainz, Germany, Lille, France and Antwerp, Belgium. The case describes the market segments within each city and lays out the marketing mix variables-the 4Ps (product, price, place and promotion)-to allow students to compare and contrast the cities' opportunities and challenges. The protagonist in each city is charged with using the marketing mix to help his or her city reach its goals: in Mainz, to reach breakeven; in Lille, to increase bicycle usage from 2% to 10% and in Antwerp, to persuade drivers to commute by bicycle instead of by car.

Is the American Century Over?
Nye, Joseph. Is the American Century Over?, 2015. Publisher's VersionAbstract

For more than a century, the United States has been the world's most powerful state. Now some analysts predict that China will soon take its place. Does this mean that we are living in a post-American world? Will China's rapid rise spark a new Cold War between the two titans?

In this compelling essay, world renowned foreign policy analyst, Joseph Nye, explains why the American century is far from over and what the US must do to retain its lead in an era of increasingly diffuse power politics. America's superpower status may well be tempered by its own domestic problems and China's economic boom, he argues, but its military, economic and soft power capabilities will continue to outstrip those of its closest rivals for decades to come.

Leadership for a Fractured World: How to Cross Boundaries, Build Bridges, and Lead Change
Williams, Dean. Leadership for a Fractured World: How to Cross Boundaries, Build Bridges, and Lead Change, 2015. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Leaders today—whether in corporations or associations, nonprofits or nations—face massive, messy, multidimensional problems. No one person or group can possibly solve them—they require the broadest possible cooperation. But, says Harvard scholar Dean Williams, our leadership models are still essentially tribal: individuals with formal authority leading in the interest of their own group. In this deeply needed new book, he outlines an approach that enables leaders to transcend internal and external boundaries and help people to collaborate, even people over whom they technically have no power.

Drawing on what he's learned from years of working in countries and organizations around the world, Williams shows leaders how to approach the delicate and creative work of boundary spanning, whether those boundaries are cultural, organizational, political, geographic, religious, or structural. Sometimes leaders themselves have to be the ones who cross the boundaries between groups. Other times, a leader's job is to build relational bridges between divided groups or even to completely break down the boundaries that block collaborative problem solving. By thinking about power and authority in a different way, leaders will become genuine change agents, able to heal wounds, resolve conflicts, and bring a fractured world together.

2014
Lydenberg, Steve. “Ethics, Politics, Sustainability and the 21st Century Trustee.” In Socially Responsible Investment in the 21st Century: Does It Make a Difference for Society? edited by Céline Louche and Tessa Hebb. Bingley, United Kingdom: Emerald Publishing Group Limited, 2014.
Lydenberg, Steve. “Responsible Investment Indexes: Origins, Nature and Purpose.” In The Handbook of Responsible Investment, edited by Natalie Beinish, James P Hawley, Tessa Hebb, Andreas GF Hoepner, David Wood, and Alexi White. Oxford, United Kingdom: Routledge, 2014.
Lydenberg, Steve, and Katie Grace. “Socially Responsible Investing and Purchasing.” In New Frontiers of Philanthropy, edited by Lester M Salamon. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press, 2014.
Lydenberg, Steve. “Reason, Rationality and Fiduciary Duty.” Journal of Business Ethics 119 (2014): 365-380.
Laidler-Kylander, Nathalie, and Pamela Varley. Measured Approach: TEGV Assesses Its Performance & Impact on Educational Enrichment Programs. Cambridge: Harvard Kennedy School, 2014. Publisher's VersionAbstract

This case traces the evolution of thinking about, and the implementation of, performance assessment at one of Turkey's largest and most respected nonprofit organizations, the Educational Volunteers Foundation of Turkey (TEGV). TEGV delivers a broad array of educational enrichment programs to low income children across Turkey through a team of volunteers. In contrast to many non-governmental organizations (NGOs) across the world, which have adopted performance measurement reluctantly, as a necessary but onerous condition of receiving grant funds, TEGV embraced the idea early, for its own organizational purposes. In the course of telling TEGV's performance assessment story, the case includes detailed descriptions of two different approaches to program review and two broader impact studies. It includes 17 pages of exhibits-most of which provide samples of study results for students to review and discuss. TEGV's approach to assessment has been varied, creative and has evolved over time. Students of performance evaluation will likely see both pluses and minuses in the nature of each assessment described in this case, ensuring a rich and lively discussion.

Hard Times: Leadership in America
Kellerman, Barbara. Hard Times: Leadership in America, 2014. Publisher's VersionAbstract

Leadership has never played a more prominent role in America's national discourse, and yet our opinions of leaders are at all-time lows. Private sector leaders are widely seen as greedy to the point of being corrupt. Public sector leaders are viewed as incompetent to the point of being inept. And, levels of trust in government have plummeted. As the title of this book conveys, leaders in America are experiencing hard times.

Barbara Kellerman argues that we focus on leaders, and even on followers, while ignoring an essential element of leadership: context. This book is a corrective. It enables leaders to track the terrain that they must navigate in order to create change. Rather than a handy-dandy manual on what to do and how to do it, Hard Times is structured as a checklist. Twenty-four brief sections cover key aspects of the American landscape. They trace evolutions and revolutions that have revised our norms, transformed our populations and institutions, and shifted our culture.

Kellerman's crash course on context reveals how significant it is to leadership. Clearer still is the fact that leadership is more difficult than it has ever been. It is context that explains why leadership is so fraught with frustration. And, it is context that makes evident why leadership will be better exercised if it is better understood. Calling out patterns that emerge from the checklist, Kellerman challenges leaders to do better. This fascinating read will change the way that all of us think about leadership, while compelling us to consider what it means for our future.

The Power of Noticing: What the Best Leaders See
Bazerman, Max. The Power of Noticing: What the Best Leaders See, 2014. Publisher's VersionAbstract

From Harvard Business School Professor and Co-Director of the Harvard Kennedy School’s Center for Public Leadership: A guide to making better decisions, noticing important information in the world around you, and improving leadership skills.

Imagine your advantage in negotiations, decision-making, and leadership if you could teach yourself to see, and evaluate, information that others overlook. The Power of Noticingprovides the blueprint for accomplishing precisely that. Max Bazerman, an expert in the field of applied behavioral psychology, draws on three decades of research and his experience instructing Harvard Business School MBAs and corporate executives to teach you how to notice and act on information that may not be immediately obvious.

Drawing on a wealth of real-world examples, from the Challenger Space Shuttle disaster to Bernie Madoff’s Ponzi scheme, Bazerman diagnoses what information went ignored in these situations, and why. Using many of the same case studies and thought experiments designed in his executive MBA classes, he challenges readers to explore their cognitive blind spots, identify any salient details they are programmed to miss, and then take steps to ensure it won’t happen again. While many bestselling business books have explained how susceptible to manipulation our irrational cognitive blindspots make us, Bazerman helps you avoid the habits that lead to poor decisions and ineffective leadership in the first place. His bookprovides a step-by-step guide to breaking bad habits and spotting the hidden details that will change your decision-making and leadership skills for the better, teaching you to: pay attention to what didn’t happen; acknowledge self-interest; invent the third choice; and realize that what you see is not all there is.

With The Power of Noticing at your side, you can learn how to notice what others miss, make better decisions, and lead more successfully.

2013
Fung, Archon. “The Principle of Affected Interests and Inclusion in Democratic Governance.” In Representation: Elections and Beyond, edited by Jack Nagel and Rogers Smith, 2013. Publisher's Version
The Brand IDEA: Managing Nonprofit Brands with Integrity, Democracy, and Affinity
Laidler-Kylander, Nathalie, and Julia Shepard Stenzel. The Brand IDEA: Managing Nonprofit Brands with Integrity, Democracy, and Affinity. 1st ed. Jossey-Bass, 2013.

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